8 Groovy Blogs you Should follow!

Back with another block blogging beatMost of my blogging over the last two years has been writing stuff for company blogs. This buys me hair gel, nappies and recharges my oyster card but, er, um, well it’s very boring, it seems people who pay you to do this have no clue how to really cause trouble and make a ruckus. 

Since the end of last year I focused on my own writing and I am a better person for it. The most rewarding bit is the stuff money can never ever ever buy like serendipity, learning and conversations both on and off line with other bloggers.

These 8 blogs are by people who are challenging the status quo, sharing, and teaching us to notice things that matter.

1. Avinash Kaushik – www.kaushik.net

Is about as close to a business blog as I like to get. Avinash writes with zeal and humour and has made analytics cool. I have been trading off his “web in your blood” line for nearly two years. If you take a picture of his book he posts it in his Flickr account. If after listening to him talk about the web you are not inspired you must have concrete pulsing through your veins.
2. Gemma Went – mumandthat.co.uk
In my very early days of my social media Gemma was the tweeter of useful links, I picked up so many tips. Now she has started a blog about being a single mum-to-be (shock horror!) I love it when people share like this, it connects the world be makes it a better place.

3. Alex Butler – www.kindredhq.com

Alex is founder of my beloved KindredHQ coworking group. Just by writing about life the universe and everything she has built a strong following on her blog. I love the way she writes from the heart, sometimes about issues that dare not speak their name. These blogs often come from by asking “what’s going on today?” at our coworking group.

4. JP Rangaswami – Confusedofcalcutta.com

JP has forgotten more about the Internet than most of us will ever know. Andy and I are always finding reasons to get him to talk at events. His cocktail of music, books, tech and customer service are just really bloody insightful. He has had some of the best jobs in the industry yet always talks about what he is learning rather than “drove customer acquisition targets to deliver best practice proactive team synergy.” He also contributed to The Cluetrain Manifesto 10 Anniversary Edition (he might even post a photo like Avinash if you send him one ;-)

5. Ian Wright – Randomlylondon.com

It takes a lot of effort to walk the tube line and documenting it all with photos and blogs takes very time too. Ian notices things and this is what makes it cool (and he does a lot for charity) we rush past so much of London and take it for granted, I sometimes wonder if anyone has noticed anything.

6. Andy Wilkes  - BT Storyteller and www.andywilkes.com

Andy made the Olympics for me and inspired me to back to Blogger for my personal blog. Andy was one of the BT storytellers and brilliantly documented the story behind the games from the (his) construction site. I love his infectious enthusiasm and he is a fine example of someone who has found their voice and art through blogging and photography.

7. Alex Ford – RAF Airman Blog

Blogs like Alex’s (and Gemma’s) are so important for the web. His very personal story of being in Afghanistan with the RAF is essential reading. This type of blog blows “top ten twitter tips for business” posts out the water. Consider the mental and physical organisation to produce this on a regular basis? He is one of the next guests on LBM Audible podcast and

8. Emily Breder – contentstud.io

Emily is a core partner in crime and motivator in my world. Her abstract writing blog shames me into publishing more often. At the same time I am a tad envious of her discipline of writing and writing and writing to get the good stuff out. If you are having trouble with writers block read her blog it will soon knock you into shape.

Who else in our 1800+ London Bloggers Community is rocking? DON’T KEEP THEM SECRET! 

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Comments

  1. says

    I agree with you about Avinash. I just began reading his Web Analytics 2.0 book a couple weeks ago, and it’s no wonder he’s a analytics evangelist for Google. I don’t usually think of myself as a “ninja” “achieving glory” by logging in to Google Analytics once a day, but he really makes you feel as if analytics is important and potentially world-changing.